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Mar 30 2016 - 4:19pm | Maya Klausner
/Judah S. Harris
/Judah S. Harris

Wine and merriment flowed together at The Jewish Week Media Group’s annual Grand Wine Tasting in Tribeca on Monday night. Located in the heart of the chic neighborhood, City Winery provided the space for hundreds of oenophiles looking to start their week on the right note — not to be too on the nose.

For the evening, the restaurant and performance venue was transformed into a kosher haven of wines, specialty cocktails and savory fare from all over the world.

Feb 18 2016 - 5:07pm | Maya Klausner
Larry David on "Curb Your Enthusiasm"/Youtube.com

If anyone was wondering whether or not God exists, there is finally indisputable proof: there is an entire day of the year reserved specifically for the consumption of wine. Finally, there is a day besides Passover when we have an excuse to gulp down four (or more) glasses of the good stuff.

Today is National Drink Wine Day, which for some of us, means the only distinction is that for a magical 24-four hour period society actually deems it acceptable to walk around with a CamelBak brimming with Pinot Grigio. (At least that’s how we choose to interpret it.)

Feb 18 2016 - 2:59pm | Joshua E. London
Chenin Blanc/JWMG
Chenin Blanc/JWMG

One of the hazards of being a wine critic is that, at any given moment, one has far more wine on hand than can be safely enjoyed.

Feb 9 2016 - 1:13pm | Joshua E. London
 Domaine La Ferrage, Côte de Brouilly, 2012. Courtesy of Monsieur Touton Ltd.

I’m a sucker for Beaujolais wines. Back around 1992, I had my first taste of Beaujolais –it was an Abarbanel import (of the 1990 vintage), and it was fabulous and I quickly fell in love with Gamay Noir, the grape from which all Beaujolais wine is made.

They’re hard to find kosher in the U.S., but there is one, imported by Victor Kosher Wines.

Jan 13 2016 - 2:30pm | Joshua E. London
/JWMG
/JWMG

I’ve been asked a lot of late about pairing wine with Chinese food. Let us start with the obvious caveat that taste is subjective and so personal preferences, should they exist, should not be presumed inadequate by any opinion expressed by a wine critic or wine sommelier. If you like this or that wine with this or that dish, then it’s a good pairing for you. That said, the question of wine and Chinese food presents some interesting challenges in part because traditional European style wine culture in China did not proceed apace with the various regional cuisines. 

Dec 9 2015 - 1:13pm | Joshua E. London
Fotolia
Fotolia

Celebratory wines, whether bubbly or sweet, suit the Chanukah season’s festivities, and they make for great gifts. Dessert-style table wines pair well with Chanukah’s rich foods, like latkes with applesauce or sour cream. But take your sweet wine to the next level by pairing them with salty foods. Think about chocolate-covered pretzels or the current craze for salted-caramel anything. Champagne, Spanish Cava or Italian Prosecco go very well with salt and fat, which make them ideal for winter festivities. 

Dec 1 2015 - 4:47pm | Joshua E. London And Lou Marmon
La Fille du Boucher. Via facebook.com

Nov 24 2015 - 12:22pm | Joshua E. London
JWMG
JWMG

When it comes to pairing wines with your Thanksgiving meal, one should keep in mind that there is no “perfect” pairing. The goal of pairing wine with food is balance; neither the food nor the wine should overpower each. General rules of thumb — like lighter foods with lighter wines, richer foods with richer, full-bodied wines — can be handy, but should not be thought of as absolute. The interplay of wine and food is necessarily subjective, but the differences among wine varietals and styles can seem dramatic.

Nov 9 2015 - 2:14pm | Gamliel Kronemer
 Côtes de Galilée Villages Cuvée Eva Rosé and Cuvée Eva Blanc.
Côtes de Galilée Villages Cuvée Eva Rosé and Cuvée Eva Blanc.

The Israeli wine trade is a tough business to break into these days.  While there were once only a handful of wineries in the country, there are now hundreds, and in that crowded field, the likelihood of a new winery surviving are little better than those of a new restaurant surviving in Manhattan.

Those odds don’t scare Jacques Capsouto, the septuagenarian restaurateur-cum-vintner, whose winery, Côtes de Galilée Villages, which is located six miles from the Israel/Lebanon border, has recently released the first wines from it inaugural vintage.

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